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Stuart King

Craftsman, artist, woodturner & photojournalist

I was born in the Buckinghamshire village of Holmer Green in 1942, and played as a child in the local Beech woods. The countryside and the trades and traditions of those that shaped it over centuries have always fascinated me and influenced my work. I have spent a lifetime researching, recording and collecting anything about the rural past and today am a well-known artist craftsman, demonstrator, international lecturer and photo-journalist.

Wildwood Archaeology

The Wildwood is still giving up its secrets, albeit slowly. Exploration started rather late due to a wet spring but continued well into the autumn with each carefully dug and recorded trench revealing a little more of life from prehistory to the medieval period.

Beech Nuts in the wild

Most folk wouldn’t recognise a beech flower. Those that remain on the trees are maturing into distinctive triangular beech nuts.

Dancing Speckled Woods

The Speckled Wood butterfly, Written after observing a pair of these woodlandbutterflies flirting in a sunbeam

Wildwood Archaeology

The Wildwood is still giving up its secrets, albeit slowly. Exploration started rather late due to a wet spring but continued well into the autumn with each carefully dug and recorded trench revealing a little more of life from prehistory to the medieval period.

Hidden Wildwood Camera

In one corner of the Wildwood is a pheasant feeder. To monitor the effectiveness I acquired an infrared motion activated camera to observe what really happens both in the daytime and at night, and I have been delighted with the first two 24 hour sequences. Amongst the visitors were badgers, muntjack deer, fox, squirrels, a rabbit, rook and jay… but no pheasants.

Mary Rose—making a sailor’s boxwood hair comb

I recently visited the new Mary Rose museum at Portsmouth. What a fantastic job they have done. I was so taken by the sailor’s boxwood hair combs that it was straight to the workshop to make a couple of examples.